Category Archives: Philosophy

Second-order pursuits and reading between the lines. I think it’s done best in social settings and when you don’t have to be evaluated for it, but that’s just me.

Hate To-Do Lists?

How about a Being List? Who will you be this week? Might as well try it.

Got this from Chris Guillebeau (on Twitter @chrisguillebeau)

Got this from Chris Guillebeau (on Twitter @chrisguillebeau)

Here’s a modest example:

To-Be Today

      • A dad to my son
      • A caring husband
      • A servant leader, who leaves a place looking better than I found it, and leaving someone feeling better than I found them
      • Helpful
      • Someone who trusts God, and trusts in something much bigger than himself
      • Someone who reaches out to somebody else that is hard for me to connect with
      • Someone who will give something without concern over what I’ll get back
      • A trusting business partner, who follows the advice of those who have gone before me
      • Sincere
      • A remover of my own excuses
      • A person who prays for people I don’t understand instead of bemoaning them
      • A person who likes what he is becoming and is thankful for what he has

It’s not easy to make a list like this at first. I found myself reverting many times to a “do” and “don’t” list. There’s nothing wrong with a Do-list (and things still need to get done), but for me it is important to balance what I do and what I am. If I’m more aware of what I’m doing and what I want to do, I can be more aware of who and what I want to become, and vice versa.

No matter what I do, I’m going to be something. I will become what I have done up to that point. If I know what I want to be, it will guide me as to what I must do in order to get there. And it starts in this moment, which is the only one I actually have.

That is an encouraging thought. ๐Ÿ˜‰

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Pi in the Ski

[This is an old post that never actually went public. I’d like to open it up to review–and criticism. Don’t read this if you get extremely uncomfortable looking down from the edge of a great height, looking into a bottomless hole, or thinking about forever.]

I saw Life of Pi last night and knew it was heavily philosophical in nature. (Well, anything with an irrational number that is, paradoxically, one of the few universal constants we can find, in the title even) is bound to be a mindjob. Knowing nothing about it other than that it was a story about a boy surviving at sea with a tiger in a small boat–and heavily recommended by my wife ;-)–I was eager to sink my teeth in.

If you haven’t seen it, I will now give some MAJOR SPOILERS!!!! So read at your own risk.

 

Did you see the MAJOR SPOILERS warning? I shall forthwith assume you’ve seen the movie too…

 

Ok, what happens after this, I wash my hands of.

First, let me say I liked the movie quite a lot. But I think people who like the film will naturally have wildly different reasons–indicator of a great story. I want to share the stream of thoughts that came after watching it.

Pi was a microcosm of what I’ll call optimistic existentialism. That is to say, the noble character of Pi who had hope and love for the world, and a hunger for truth and justice, found himself slammed into the absurdity of the real–or at least what seems “realer.”

I’m defining absurdity here as utter meaninglessness. Even though any death or tragedy is a painful situation, we can face situations in which someone suffers or dies for the sake of a loved one or the greater good much more easily than facing someone’s suffering or dying for no conceivable reason at all.

Pi saw purpose in life; he saw more than most. When it seemed like purpose was slipping away, he went and looked for it. But as hard as Pi looked, I couldn’t shake the feeling while I watched film that the writer of the story reveals where he falls in this spectrum. He tried to have a poker face but he had a few tells, and they always pivoted around the tiger.

The first encounter with the tiger, Richard Parker, entailed Pi looking into his eyes and seemingly into his soul, but the father proved to him that he’s just a senseless carnivore. That powerful scene split the audience well. (“No, he did connect with Richard Parker! His Dad messed it up and distracted him!” “No, the dad saved him by showing him the connection was an illusion!” and so on.)

He cannot be tamed, but he can be trained…

 

Did I want to believe that the tiger wouldn’t have taken his hand off? Sure. There was magic happening in that look–why was the tiger looking at him and not just at the meat? His father felt differently of course, seeing nothing more than a tiger about to tear his son’s hand off, driven by pure instinct.

That is an ANGRY cat

 

Dancing

This dynamic came up again and again through their relationship on the boat, but the most telling event (to me) was the stars scene.

Richard Parker stares off into the night sky, and Pi asks him, “What are you looking at?”, half annoyed and half desperate to know. Slowly–very slowly–Richard Parker gazes down into the water. Pi looks to see what the tiger is staring at, almost as if he is beckoning him to look. In a dreamlike state, Pi sees all the way down and all the way through. Like looking into Krishna’s mouth, he sees the whole universe. All his experience, all the animals and people that died in the shipwreck, his mother, his family, and at the very bottom–the deepest point on the planet Earth–is the wrecked ship that he had left behind. Their tragic end. He had left one ship to end up on this tiny boat. Floating to who knows where?

Staring into the abyss

What I think the movie is “about” if you could say that is that no matter what worldview you hold, you will have to encounter and deal with the absurdity of life and purpose. How does this stuff with no apparent hope or purpose not overwhelm the quest for life and goodness? People come out on the other side with different views but they have to go through it nonetheless. It’s not that life and purpose are absurd, but that their endurance through all the absurdity does actually occur always has and always will be debated, and it seems to me that personal choice plays a big role in which way a person goes. I believe in the end that they are real and that there is a Glory, so real and so good that it’s own existence is even more important than anyone’s experience of it. But that doesn’t mean that the pursuit of it may not have points along the way that go pitch black.

The two interpretations of the story of Life of Pi–one with the face-value story of the animals and the lone boy on the boat, and the other with the bitter but more plausible account of the few survivors and the boy having to kill the cook–could be summed up as the amazing/hopeful story and the horrific/cynical story. My bottom line is that both of these stories fit the human experience at times and there can still be a greater Good at the bright end of it all. God is.

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Is he floating aimlessly through the ocean? Through the sky? Through the world? Through space and time?โ€“does it make a difference?

I think when you’ve thought about this and looked at it honestly for a while, then you can completely understand what Nietzsche was talking about when he said that if you stare into the abyss long enough, “the abyss stares back.” But staring into it doesn’t mean it wins. Or that it is ultimately all that there is. That is up to each of us.

 

P.S. When looking for images for this blog, I came across this:

Something to think about.

Don’t judge me!…Officer!

Recently an acquaintance of mine completely shocked me with brazen illogical rudeness. He dropped himself into a marginalized category of people: pretentious, arrogant, selfish, crooked, and calloused as sociopaths and politicians.

I’m talking about handicap parking impostors.

What’s more is that he’s a community service worker, and someone who not only knows the law better than the average person. But he was having a bad day and nothing was going right. So to make himself feel better (presumably) he took the spot from handicapped people, and then declared:

Yes, I parked in the handicap spot. DON’T JUDGE ME.

I couldn’t believe it.

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Being “Yourself” is oppressive…

It’s popular–even heroic–to be true to yourself and to encourage others to do the same. And you’re a pawn or an oppressive bigot if you do the opposite. But can’t you be just as bad on the other end for someone who really wants to change their conflicted nature? The radical individualist then becomes the criminal.

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I was told that The Iron Giant was built and pitched in the question, “What if a gun had a soul?” When the giant discovers that he actually was designed to be a weapon of mass destruction, he wills to overcome his purpose–his “true self.”

What makes this self-denying act heroic?

Grief and panic are inevitable, but hopeful

Today made me really pause and reflect on those events in our lives in which nothing can prepare us or help us through–we just have to go on through it.

In my blog entry Blessing of fear, I talked about fear in fiction, fantasy, or play helped children grow to cope through dealing with real fear later on. But sometimes there is nothing that can prepare a child, no coaching to guide them, and no delayed gratification that can incentivize them. But you the adult know (hopefully, theoretically) that they will be okay and this can turn into something that can help them later on.

You’ve probably seen something like this in the form of a small child’s first real separation from mom and dad. That one kid on the first day of kindergarten that absolutely panics when mom drops him/her off, clinging to her pant leg–“NOOOOOO!!!”

It’s almost comical to everyone on the outside because they know better. But that child is being devastated before our eyes. He has no past experience to draw from; no confidence to take care of himself; no reason to think everything will be ok. In the end you just have to pry him off and turn your back on him–walk out and know it will work out.

You’ve probably seen adults go through it too. When they are abandoned by their partners, betrayed by friends or family, lose a child, find out they’re terminally ill…

“Experience is a brutal teacher. By you learn–my god, you learn.”
Lewis, Shadowlands

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